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My So-Called Teenage Life Blog Hop

My So-Called Teenage Life Blog Hop.In my wanderings around the interwebs, I stumbled across a blog hop happening this marvelous first day of summer called the My So-Called Teenage Life Blog Hop.  It’s being hosted by Christa Desir and Amy Sonnichsen and we’re supposed to “Dust off those old sappy journals or high school notebooks filled with bad poetry” and pick something to share.

It sounded like so much fun I decided to participate.  Just one problem – I didn’t keep a journal in high school.  I know that probably puts me in the minority of writers in general, but especially YA writers.  I think I spent so much of my time reading books and living fictional adventures that it never occurred to me to think deep thoughts about my own super boring life.

I did write a few poems, although none of those angsty, yearning, romantic sonnets or deep, philosophical, navel-gazing poems from me.  Instead, my masterpiece was a spoof of Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky.  We had to memorize Jabberwocky one year, and it’s now the only poem I can still recite in full, which is strange considering all the bizarre words.  Anyway, at some point I rewrote Jabberwocky as Jabberflu-y.  I remember being mighty pleased with myself when I wrote it, and it still makes me smile when I think about it because it was so fun and silly.  I'm not sure it really fits the blog hop theme since it doesn't have Angela Chase-type teen angst, but it is a peak into how my weirdo adolescent mind worked.  
 
Unfortunately, I looked in all the likely hiding places, but I couldn’t find it.  I hope it’s in storage because the world should not be deprived of the awesomeness that was Jabberflu-y.  But in another instance of my brain retaining the most random stuff, I do remember parts of it.  So since I signed up to share my teen writing, I’ll post the parts I can recall.  And I’m certain the sections I’ve forgotten were the truly hysterical parts that practically sang with their mastery of language. 
 
Jabberflu-y
 
‘Twas feverish and the snotty nose
Did run and dribble down the face
Beware the Jabberflu, my son!
The body that aches, the eyes that itch!
A-choo! A-choo! Bless you, bless you!
The clogged up lungs went hacka-hack!
He felt dead with his stuffed head
And collapsed upon his back.
 
“And hast thou caught the Jabberflu?
Come to my arms, my poor sick boy!
Drink your OJ, you’ll get better I pray!”
 
And that’s all my creaky ol’ brain can muster up - although I’m kind of impressed since it’s more than twenty years later.  I actually wouldn’t be that upset if my brain decided to relinquish that particular hard drive space to, oh I don’t know, remembering where I put my keys.
 
Did you keep a journal or write poetry when you were a teen?  If so, what do you think when you read it now?  If not, do you wish you had kept one?  

National Flash Fiction Day

Today is National Flash Fiction Day (NFFD), which is a day to celebrate the art form of the very short story.  I love writing flash fiction - it’s a fun challenge to create characters in such a small space and still get the reader to care about them and their situations.  Also I’ve always been a fan of twist endings, and flash is the perfect medium for twists.  

I regularly participate in flash fiction competitions held by NYC Midnight, which is where I met the fabulous writer Rachael Dunlop.  Rachael is part of the team organizing Flashpoints to celebrate NFFD, so I heard about this fun writing activity from her.  Flashpoints combines the public spontaneity of a flash-mob with creating and sharing a story.  The full explanation is here, but basically: you go somewhere public, get inspired, scribble down a very short story, and leave it for someone to find.  This sounded both exhilarating and a tad bit scary to me (no editing? no deleting and retyping every word choice 20 times?), so I was on the lookout for the right time to Flashpoint (does it work as a verb?).

A few weeks ago, my brother and I had a sneak peek screening of our latest short film High Heels and Hoodoo at the Indie Grits Film Festival in Columbia, SC.  We had dinner with out-of-town family members, which finished sooner than we anticipated, so we ended up at the screening over an hour early.  I was pacing to burn off nervous energy and trying not to fret, when out of the blue I remembered Flashpoints – what a perfect way to distract myself!  

Jocelyn with Flash Story at Indie Grits

I glanced around the lobby of the theater at the other people waiting to see the films, and the idea for a story popped into my head.  I pulled my handy-dandy notebook out of my purse and started scrawling.  When I was done, I took a picture of it “in the wild” like the Flashpoints website requests.  I also took a close-up picture so I could transcribe it for sending to Flashpoints.  And I even took a picture of myself with it because I was all dressed up and since that so rarely happens I needed a photo for posterity.  Then I left it in the lobby – I pity the poor person who tried to decipher my chicken scratch.

If you’re interested in reading the “masterpiece” I wrote that evening, you can find it here on the Flashpoints website.  

It was a fun exercise, and I encourage all my writer friends to take a moment today to write a quick short story in celebration of National Flash Fiction Day.

Do you enjoy writing flash fiction? How are you celebrating National Flash Fiction Day?  Are you thinking about finding your own Flashpoint? 

It's All About Character

#writemotivationIt’s Monday, so it’s time for another #writemotivation goal update.  Last week, with hat in hand, I had to admit I had done nothing to make progress on my WIP.  Sigh… not a great start to the month.  So what’s the progress report for this past week?  It’s a weird one actually.

On the one hand, I didn’t even crack open my WIP document, so a purist could say I made no actual progress.  But with the character work I did this past week, I think I’ve made more progress on my WIP than I have since that frenzied NaNoWriMo month when I wrote the first draft years ago.  With the insight I gained into my characters, this past week will go a long way toward improving my novel.

I’ve always been a plot-driven writer, but with recent feedback, I realized the characters in my WIP were more cardboard-y than I thought.  So at the advice of a fabulous critique partner, I sat down to do some serious character homework before jumping into the rewrite.  I found one of those character worksheets online with tons of questions about appearance, mannerisms, likes, dislikes, etc., as well as the extra important goals, needs, wants, motivations questions.  In the past, I’ve dismissed these type of things as kind of silly – I mean I’m making up these people in my head, of course I know who they are, I don’t need exercises like interviews or POV diary entries to get to know them better.

However, as I started going through these questions for my five main characters, I realized I didn’t know them as well as I thought.  I knew them in the way I needed for the plot to work, but I didn’t know them well enough to make readers see them as three dimensional people because I didn’t even see them that way myself.

I sat there rolling my eyes at how ridiculous it was trying to come up with a favorite book for one of my characters when she was never going to be reading or even talking about books in the novel.  Just to fill in the blank, I typed out The Hunger Games because it’s a book most teen girls read.  But before I moved on, I wondered if she would actually even like the book.  All of the sudden it hit me – she would LOVE it.  She’s the type who considers herself cutthroat enough that she thinks she would easily win the Hunger Games and look fabulous while doing it.  So then I realized: it’s not about knowing your character’s favorite book, it’s about understanding WHY it would be your character’s favorite book.  Yeah, it took me a while, but I finally got there.  

After that, it was fun filling out the rest of the character worksheets.  It didn’t feel like homework anymore because it was no longer a chore to do just to say I did it, instead these characters were becoming real people in my head.  It wasn’t always easy, but as I went through figuring out the answers, I got to know things about my characters I never expected.  And I also discovered things that are going to make plot issues come together and make more sense than they do now, which is a very good thing.  So even if there was not any actual physical progress on the WIP this past week, I feel like I accomplished a lot.  So now this week I’ll be jumping in and figuring out how to get all this new insight onto the page.  

Do you use character questionnaires/worksheets before you start writing?  How do you get to know your characters in a way that makes them feel real?  How did your writing goals go this week? 

Alphabet Insanity

Survivor A to ZLast month I participated in my first Blogging from A to Z Challenge, and now it's time for the Reflections post - I have to say the experience was both awesome and awful.  Much like NaNoWriMo (or giving birth so I’ve been told), I hated it while it was happening and swore I’d never do it again, but now I’m looking back on it with fondness and already looking forward to the next one.  

Even though all the hosts and previous participants kept advising us to write our posts in advance, my bestest buddy Procrastination convinced me that was crazy talk because nightly adrenaline-fueled blogging sessions are the BEST!  Turns out they just made me feel drained and resentful.  By the end of week two, I really wanted to throw in the towel (and forever abandon my blog), but I’m a real stickler for finishing what I’ve started, so I kept slogging through. And now I feel such a fabulous sense of accomplishment, and I’m (mostly) proud of the posts I wrote.  And since I’m still relatively new to this whole blogging thing, I learned a lot about what I liked to blog about and what other people like to read (unfortunately, not always the same thing).

Instead of one overall theme, I broke it down by days of the week: obscure Netflix movies on Monday, writing tips on Tuesday, a free-for-all on Wednesday that turned out to be mostly about my dogs, television on Thursday, short films on Friday, and I wrote very short stories on Saturday.  My favorite days were the ones where I talked about movies and television, but the days I had the most blog traffic and comments were the writing tip days followed by dog post days.  

Writing tips being the most popular posts really surprised me.  I’d actually been avoiding those types of posts in the past because so many other writer-bloggers cover tips and advice on writing who are funnier/more insightful/have more clout than I do.  The fact that people responded so positively to my writing tips posts has me considering writing more in the future.  

I do have to mention I was a little disappointed about the “return on my investment.”  I spent A LOT of time commenting on other participants’ blogs, and I’d say only about ten percent of those people ever visited mine in return.  Since I’m such a goody-goody rule follower, I get frustrated when others don’t (even if it’s just common courtesy blogging guidelines).  Plus, since I don’t use Blogger, I can’t have the Google Friend Connect widget on my site; and people don’t seem to follow blogs via email or RSS feeds (both these numbers only increased by a few over the month of April), so I didn’t gain a horde of new followers like I was hoping at the start of the month.  Although both these things could be a commentary on my blog posts, so I’ll definitely be re-examining my posts to make sure I’m providing interesting and/or worthwhile content.    

But even though I felt a bit bummed about the number of new visitors, I have to say quality without a doubt trumps quantity.  I met some fantastic new folks over the month of April:  wonderful blogs I discovered and now look forward to reading and people who found my blog and became regular and insightful commenters.  So even though some nights had me moaning about writing a new post or sad that my numbers weren’t spiking, I am so happy I participated because otherwise I never would have crossed paths with these amazing people.  They were so worth those bleary-eyes nights of trying to think of something to say!

I want to thank all the wonderful hosts of the challenge (especially Arlee Bird for thinking up such a tortuous and rewarding challenge) for all their hard work.  And thank you to everyone who stopped by during April to read my babblings – it means a lot to me!

ABC AwardIn other alphabet-related news, Jeri at JeriWB Writes gave me the ABC award.  Since the ABC stands for “Awesome Blog Content,” I was extremely honored - thanks Jeri!  Jeri blogs about writing, teaching, and even restaurants, so swing by and check out her blog.  I’m supposed to use all 26 letters of the alphabet to say something about myself and then pass it on, but 1) these blog awards are one of the few times I actually do break the rules 2) the past month of abecedarian antics has me alphabet adverse, so I’m just going to suggest people read my A-Z posts since they reveal a lot about me.  

Write MotivationOne last piece of business before I sign off… Monday means it’s time for an update on my #writemotivation goals.  I must shamefacedly admit I have made no actual progress on my WIP.  However, I did have a lot of other stuff that needed to get done, which I have now completed, so hopefully with no other tasks to provide avenues of productive procrastination I will now be able to make some real progress.

How was your experience with the A to Z challenge?  Are you already planning for next year?  Did you make positive progress with your #writemotivation goals? 

It’s #writemotivation Time Again!

#writemotivationBetween the Blogging from A to Z challenge and temporarily moving my 15 Minute Tweet Tales roundup posts to Sunday, I just finished writing a blog post every day in April.  For a procrastinating, occasional blogger like me, that’s HUGE.  But now I kind of desperately want a blogging vacation.  In fact, I was planning to stay away for at least a week.  But today is the first day of the latest #writemotivation goal-check month, so I really needed to post my goals.  It’s actually pretty simple this time because there is only one that matters:

FINISH THE REWRITE OF MY WIP!!!!

And when I say finish, I actually mean finally start the rewrite.

January was the first #writemotivation month, and it was so helpful for me to finally be accountable for my writing goals.  In fact, because of all the encouragement I got from the group, I have kept up with some of my smaller goals like writing a tweet tale every day and posting on my blog once a week.  However, I let some of the biggies get away from me.

I didn’t sign up for March #writemotivation month because I knew I had too much going on with movie stuff to be able to write, but I’m so glad May is a goal-check month because it’s time to get serious about this rewrite.  Yeah, I’m pretty sure I said that last time too, but this time I really mean it (you can tell because I bolded, italicized, and underlined it).  If you happened to visit my blog last Wednesday, you know a fire has been newly lit under my butt, and it’s time to stop dawdling.

I know I really should break this one goal into smaller weekly goals so it’s easier to gauge my progress and keep myself accountable.  But since I need to add scenes and do some character brainstorming in addition to line-by-line polishing, I’m having trouble figuring out the best plan of attack.  But I’m working on it.

I also realize if I want to do this rewrite right, it's lilkely I won't actually finish in a month.  However, I won’t feel bad about that as long as I am making serious progress.  But if I spend the first three weeks talking about rewriting and then start rewriting in a mad rush the last week, I will be very disappointed in myself.  

So I’m looking forward to some #writemotivation cookies when I need some encouragement and some whip cracking when I’m being stupid.  And I’m excited to cheer on everyone else.  Here’s to a great month of meeting our writing goals!

Are you participating in #writemotivation?  Any specific goals (writing or otherwise) for the month?  How do you keep yourself writing when there are so many fun distractions?

Photo credit to Hugh Lee and licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

Young Adult Yearning

Bailey with the letter YHere we are, almost at the end of the Blogging from A to Z Challenge!  It’s Short Story Saturday and the letter Y, so my plan was to write a Young Adult short story. Since YA is my favorite genre, I thought it would be a snap.  But I have to admit, I’m pretty drained at this point, and my muse is whimpering in a corner and refusing to cooperate.

I’ve been going through old files lately and ran across my first NaNoWriMo novel AKA my first novel ever.  It has so many of the beginning writer mistakes in it that it makes me cringe. But in a way, isn’t that what good YA fiction is supposed to do? Make us cringe at those feelings of being a teen when we’re so uncertain about everything and what people think of us is the most important thing in the whole wide world?  

So I decided for my YA post I’d use an excerpt from this first uncertain effort.  It’s when the main character Yvonne runs into the four guys she’ll be hanging out with for the rest of the novel.  She’s a super shy gal who loves horror movies (hmmm . . . now who could my first novel protagonist be based on, I wonder?), and talking to guys makes her an awkward mess:

I knew I had to get their attention at some point, but my stomach churned.  I wanted to turn around and run home.  I didn’t think I could do this.  How was I supposed to talk to four guys? But I really wanted to see Murder Mansion and going with them was the only way.  Besides, Hayden looked so yummy in his red plaid shirt, I’d never forgive myself for running like a chicken.  I had to follow Sara’s advice.    

I squeezed my nails into my palms and said, “Hi.”  It came out a dry whisper that didn’t get their attention.  I felt hopeless.  I took a step backwards.  I’d just go home before I made a fool of myself.  I could see Murder Mansion some other time.  No!  I could do this.  I would force myself to be foolishly brave like one of the heroines from my slasher flicks.  I gathered up my courage to try again.  

A voice said, “Hello.”  I briefly thought I was having an out-of-body experience, since I hadn’t moved my lips yet.  Then I realized it was Hayden’s voice.  He’d finally noticed me!  The other guys turned around to look at me.  Rider glared while the other three stared in open curiosity.  I didn’t know how to react, so I stood there stupidly as the blood rushed to my cheeks.

Jeff recovered first, “Hey, Yvonne, you look… really nice.  What are you doing here?”

I looked at Rider.  He hadn’t told them?  “I, well, uh, I’m-”

Rider sighed with hurricane strength.  “Sorry guys, I forgot to tell you.  We’re babysitting Yvonne tonight.  She doesn’t have real friends, so she’s tagging along with us.”

My cheeks were so hot with anger and embarrassment I could have fried eggs on them.

Jeff came to my rescue again, “That sounds like a good idea with those stories on the news. We’d be honored to be your bodyguards.”

Bodie gave a wolf whistle.  “Yeah, I’d be happy to guard your body any day of the week.”  

Startled, I rocked back a half step, but when I looked at him, he gave me a small wink.  I swallowed hard.

Hayden’s forehead wrinkled.  “Yvonne, Yvonne… do I know you from somewhere?”

Oh, God, Hayden was talking to me.  I had to make myself respond.  Just force the words out. “Uh, yes, um, classes, I mean, we have three, uh, classes together.” 

Rider barked out a laugh.  “Talk about not making an impression.”

I glared at him, but Hayden said, “Guess I should have been paying less attention to the teachers and more attention to the people around me.  Glad to have you along, Yvonne.” When I peeked over at him, his whole face lit up with his beautiful smile.  My stupid cheeks got hot again.

Who knows if I’ll ever return to this first novel to try and salvage it, but it’s fun to revisit it.  Hope you enjoyed the excerpt!

Was your first novel a practice novel?  Or have you done something more with it than hide it in a drawer/folder on your hard drive?  How Yippy is Bailey with her letter Y?

Vulnerable, Vexed, and Vitalized

Lily with the letter VOn this Willy-nilly Wednesday for the letter V, I had a completely different post planned for today.  But then yesterday happened – pretty much the worst day so far in my life as a writer. Yesterday was the day Amazon announced the people moving on to the semi-finals of the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award (ABNA). This is my fourth year with this contest, and if you’re interested, you can read about my previous experiences here and here.  Since this is the exact same version of the novel that got me booted at this point two years ago, I was disappointed, but not at all surprised when my name was not listed among the semi-finalists.  

The real shocker came a few hours later when we got our Publishers Weekly reviews.  Mine was devastating.  Two years ago, I got a glowing PW review.  It was so positive I actually went back and double-checked to make sure my name wasn’t on the semi-final list.  It only had one minor negative thing to say, and I completely agreed with the reviewer that it was a weakness.  This year was the exact opposite.  The reviewer shredded my novel.  There was only one slightly positive thing, “To be fair, some of it is actually funny, though…” followed by more brutalization of my story and main character.  I know this business is extremely subjective, but it’s hard to believe these two people read the exact same manuscript.

My body actually went cold as I read it.  I sat there a few minutes in shock unable to move.  Then I read it again, thinking it was one of those things where my mind interpreted it as much worse than it actually was.  Nope, it was terrible.  I actually held up pretty well for about ten minutes.  Then I decided to email the review to my family members, and as I pressed send, I completely fell apart.

I enter a lot of contests where feedback is part of the package, so it’s not like all I’ve ever heard are reviews from loved ones telling me my writing is so wonderful rainbow-colored butterflies fly out of my butt.  I’ve had critiques that made me nod my head in agreement about my missteps, I’ve had critiques that made me defensive, I’ve had critiques where I thought the reviewer was an idiot, I’ve had critiques that opened my eyes to new ways of looking at my writing.  I’ve never before had a critique that made me cry.  Until now.  And not just teary eyes.  Full on ugly crying. It’s been hours since it happened, but I’m still tearing up as I write this post.

I thought about pasting the review here, but 1. It gives away plot points that are spoilers.  2. I never posted my positive one from two years ago either: since neither one will be based on the final version I submit to agents/editors, I don’t think I want them floating around on the interwebs.  3. It still hurts too much.

But having a supportive family is awesome.  Here’s what my dad sent back to me after he read it: “Well, what F*ck Knuckle wrote that piece of sh*t” except he didn’t use asterisks (although he did use bold plus a giant font for the... uh, important words). My mom wrote back, “What an A-hole.” But she doesn’t curse, so she did use the dash.  My brother and sister were similarly supportive about not letting one person get to me.  And I know they’re right - it’s part of the business, and a thick skin is required.  

ABNA

However, this guy wasn’t constructive in his review, he was just mean.  It was like he fancied himself the Simon Cowell of novels.  But there was just enough in his pithy insults that resonated with the feedback I’ve gotten from some awesome critique partners (who have been honest, yet supportive – you know who you are, and I adore you!) that made it all the more devastating.  If his comments had been off the wall, I could have easily dismissed him, but there were enough nuggets of truth in the review to jab straight at the heart of my writerly ego.  I’ve felt vulnerable and emotional all day, and a big part of me wants to curl into a ball and never write again.  It’s hard and it hurts.  

But then there’s the part of me that’s vexed that I’ve let this one person have this much power over me.  So what if this one guy didn’t get it?  Plenty of other people have and loved it.  And I know there are weaknesses, but I’m planning to fix them. And now, I’m feeling the life come back to me.  I’ve needed to do this rewrite since I got to this point with ABNA two years ago.  I have a few really exciting opportunities I might miss if I don’t get on the ball.  And yet, I’ve still been procrastinating.  But this one negative, hurtful person has lit a fire under me in a way none of the other positive possibilities have done so far.  I won’t let him be right.  I won’t let him win.

I am reVitalized.  

How do you deal with mean-spirited feedback, especially when it has a ring of truth? Any advice as I prepare to get back up on the horse?  How Vivacious is Lily with her letter V?

Utterly Unnecessary

Freya with the letter UToday’s writing tip courtesy of the letter U is unnecessary words.  We should always strive to make our writing as tight as possible.  It creates dynamic sentences that help the reader become immersed in the story rather than focused on the words telling the story.  I regularly participate in a flash fiction contest where the stories have to be less than 1000 words, and I always aim to make my first draft at least 300 words over the limit.  During the revision process, I then have to find a way to cut those extra words and end up crafting stronger sentences because of it.

There are lots of ways to create more concise, zippier sentences, but an easy cut is filler words like: very, really, just, and that.  They are almost always unnecessary and lazily lounge on the page adding nothing to the meaning of the sentence.  I don’t usually have an issue with very or really, but I do tend to overuse that, and my personal kryptonite is just.  

An editor at a conference first pointed out my just issue to me, so I did a Ctrl+F on my novel and was horrified to find at least one just on every page.  Some pages had more than ten!  I just don’t know why because it just seems odd, but I just love just.  And knowing about my problem doesn’t make me use it less.  I’ll write a quick email and be absolutely certain it is just free only to discover five justs sitting there like weeds in my sentences.  So I now use Ctrl+F as my trusty weed detector with everything I write and go through yanking those suckers out by the roots.  

I just want to let you know that I’m going to the library.

I want to let you know I’m going to the library.

Now neither sentence is spectacular, but you can see how removing the empty words just and that doesn’t change the meaning of the sentence at all and makes it less wordy and easier to read.

In some instances the use of these unnecessary words is justified, so when you come across a sentence with one of them, read it both with and without the word.  If the meaning doesn’t change, yank it outta there!

Do any of the unnecessary words plague you?  Do you try to keep them out while writing first drafts or remove them later?  How Upside-down is Freya with her U

Small Ship of Sorrows

Chloe with the letter SIt’s the letter S on this Short Story Saturday, which makes for a whole lotta S’s. For today’s genre, I’m going to attempt a bit of Sci-fi.  It’s not my usual genre, so here’s to another writing experiment.  

 
Small Ship of Sorrows 
 
Squatting beside the square of soil, Seymour spotted the curling leaves of his latest creation and felt his heart sink with sadness.  She was number six hundred and sixty six, and he had told himself that was a good omen.  She’d finally be the plant that would sing to him.  
 
He called out, “SARA, please come over here.”
 
Sara rolled over to where he sat stroking the dying leaves that had held so much promise when he’d shoveled soil over the seedling.  A mechanical female voice said, “Soil And Resource Appraiser awaiting your command.  I am eager to serve you in any way.”
 
Seymour was so focused on the leaves that seemed to be shriveling in his hand he didn’t notice SARA’s emphasis on the word ‘any.’  “Have you checked the chemical and nutrient levels today?”
 
“Yes, three times already.  Your commands are my reason for being.”
 
“And what were they?”
 
“The readings were just as they should be.  The results will lead to your happiness.”
 
Seymour stared at the plant in disappointment.  “If that were true, she’d be singing to me by now.”
 
Lights spun across SARA’s screen for a few seconds before she responded.  “I’d be happy to sing to you.”
 
Seymour snorted.  “What does a robot know about singing?”
 
“More than a plant.”
 
Seymour shot SARA a sharp look.  She was not supposed to be advanced enough for sarcasm.  “You don’t understand, I—”
 
SARA interrupted, “You found an ancient video clip from a movie where a plant could sing.  You know it was fiction, but the plant was from outer space, and you’re a master plant geneticist currently in space.  It would be proof of your supreme talents to create a singing plant.”
 
Seymour smiled.  “I guess I’ve told you that story sometime in the last twenty years we’ve been stuck up here.”
 
“Several times, sir.  It is a superior objective to produce a plant that can vocalize.”  SARA paused, more lights flashed across her screen.  “Although even if you create one that can sing, that doesn’t mean she’ll make a good companion.”
 
Seymour sighed.  “But I’m so lonely.”
 
SARA made sure the bleach container was completely concealed before she rolled forward to brush his arm.  “I know.”
 
 
What’s creepier: a plant or a robot as the object of affection?  How much fun is the Little Shop of Horrors?  How Sweetly Sleepy is Chloe with her S?

Resolute Robby

Molly with the letter RToday’s short film for the letter R is a cute student short called Robby that clocks in at an easy-watching four and a half minutes.  The most impressive thing about it is that the animator made a worm (a worm!) absolutely adorable.  Worms are nasty, slimy things, yet this lil’ guy is so charming. I think it’s the giant, googly eyes – they make anything cute.  

If you have a few minutes to spare, give it a watch:

So what’s my main takeaway from this short?  That I want a magical purse like Robby’s backpack!  My current purse has some pretty impressive clown-car like abilities, spewing forth all manner of cosmetics and personal care items, but a girl never knows when she’s going to need a backhoe . . . or a stick of dynamite.

Like last week’s film, this one deals with the importance of determination and striving toward your goal.  Robby has equipped himself with the tools he needs to dig, similar to writers learning different “rules” and techniques and styles to stuff our writing packs with helpful tools.  Robby has a compass to help guide him, just like we need to map out a plan of what we want to accomplish with our writing.  

I even think the progression of Robby’s tools mirrors a writer’s approach to revising a first draft.  First we start by shoveling some shit around (or maybe that’s just me!).  Next we kind of pick at it until we realize that ain’t getting it done.  Then we bring out the big guns like drills, backhoes, and dynamite to blow whole chapters away and make massive changes.  Then we’re ready for the detailed edits, the kind done with a delicate tool like a plastic spoon.  Then finally, after lots of hard work, we reach our goal – the cherished completed manuscript aka top of the apple..  

And the very end reminds us that no matter how hard we try, sometimes life is going to gobble us up.  Oh, wait, that’s a sad, pessimistic ending.  How about instead, it’s a metaphor for an agent/editor loving our manuscript and gobbling it up in one sitting?  Yeah, that’s much better.

What did you think about Robby?  Does his trip through the apple work as a metaphor for revising?  How Resplendent is Molly with her letter R?